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Vibration impacts MEMS-based inertial sensors; this is true for our inertial sensors or any other manufacturers.
Every effort must be made to eliminate vibration.
Vibration in the environment frame can significantly degrade the performance of the inertial sensor, particularly constant, unchanging vibration.
Strong, continuous vibrations appear as unaccounted noise to the filter, degrading its performance.
The accelerometers can't tell the difference between vibration and acceleration, and therefore the filter receives erroneous input.
We would suggest using some vibration damping materials to mount the inertial sensor.
Here are some product manufacturers:
·         http://www.earsc.com/
·         http://www.sorbothane.com/
Here is an on-line source for ordering small quantities, small squares of material: http://www.mcmaster.com/#ultra-soft-polyurethane/=gai91i
The idea is to place the pad between the vehicle frame and the inertial sensor to isolate the inertial sensor.

There are many ways to physically accomplish this damping.

As an example, you could mount the inertial sensor on the aluminum plate and place a Sorbothane pad between the plate and the vehicle frame.

Sorbothane can be purchased with double-sided adhesive.
Be careful not to defeat the isolation by using through-bolts that transfer the vehicle frame vibration to the inertial sensor (or in this example, the aluminum plate holding it).

Utilize the Bandwidth Calculator to determine how many nodes can be ran on one base station.

The WSDA-2000 is configured to send data to our SensorCloud service, and cannot be reprogrammed to send data elsewhere.  The SensorCloud API  can be used to copy/move data from SensorCloud to another cloud service, or our Microstrain Communications Library (MSCL) can be used to create software to configure wireless sensors, start them sampling, collect data and handle to data in any manner the user desires.  

When you open the SensorConnect application you will find an icon in the top right corner of the window that looks like 3 horizontal lines:

When this icon is highlighted in orange that indicates that an update is available.  Click on the icon and select “update available”:

This will direct you to the location of the SensorConnect downloads page on the MicroStrain website.

Click on the download that corresponds to your system’s configuration (64-bit vs. 32-bit).  Once the download has completed double click the “SensorConnect_X.X.X.msi” file to run the installation.  Follow the on-screen prompts to perform the update.  Note:  SensorConnect will need to be closed in order to complete the installation.

When you re-open SensorConnect the icon in the top right corner or the window should no longer be highlighted in orange, indicating that you are running the latest version of the application.

Refer to the power profiles available under the documentation tab of the node of interest.

V-Link 200: http://www.microstrain.com/g-link-200_power-profile/insert_into_website.htm

G-Link 200: http://www.microstrain.com/g-link-200_power-profile/insert_into_website.htm

G-Link 200 OEM: Coming soon

The 200 series wireless nodes have 16 Mbytes of datalogging memory.  

Now the question arises, ‘how long can a node datalog before its memory is full?’. The answer is that it varies depending on how many channels are being sampled, sample rate, and data type. Here are two examples:

V-Link-200 set so that channel 1 is enabled with a sample rate 2048 Hz, and data type of Float(4 byte).  Our calculation would be:

  • 1 channel x 2,048 samples per second = 2,048 data points per second
  • 2.048 data points x 4 byte float data packet = 8,192 bytes per second
  • 16 MB (rounded down) ÷ 8,192 bytes per second = 1953 seconds (rounded down)
  • 1953 seconds ÷ 60 seconds per minute = ~32 minutes to fill the memory

G-Link-200 set so that channels 1, 2 and 3 are enabled with a sample rate of 32 Hz, and data type of int24(3 byte).  Our calculation would be:

  • 3 channels x 32 samples per second = 96 data points per second
  • 96 data points x 3 byte int24 data packet = 288 bytes per second
  • 16 MB (rounded down) ÷ 288 bytes per second = 55,555 seconds (rounded down)
  • 55,555 seconds ÷ 60 seconds per minute = ~925 minutes (~15 hours) to fill the memory

The V-Link-200  has 4 strain gauge channels that come from the factory set to Full-bridge.  When ordering these units, you must specify the bridge completion for each channel.  Half and quarter bridge completions are available and channels can be mixed and matched.  These completions are accomplished in the factory as part of the final assembly, 

See the V-Link 200 user's manual http://www.microstrain.com/sites/default/files/v-link-200_user_manual_85... on how to connect strain gauges (page 44 -45), and pages 57 - 59 on how to calibrate the strain gauge to output µstrain with the V-link-200.

The % bandwidth has to do with how many nodes/channels you can use at one time.  When setting up a Synchronized Sampling network, SensorConnect will interrogate each node and assign transmission slots for them to send data to the base station.  This is designed to keep the nodes from broadcasting at the same time and causing data loss.  The more channels, and higher sample rate of a node will require more transmission slots, thus higher % of available bandwidth used.  Use the Calculare System Bandwidth calculator to build your system http://sensorcloud.com/pricing?onlyCalc=true 

Excel displays our time stamp incorrectly.  If you were to open the data file in Notepad you would see the correct time format. 

To correct the data in Excel, Highlight all of column A, right click on the highlighted region and select Format Cells.  Under the Number tab select Custom, Scroll to the bottom of the list that appears and select “m/d/yyyy h:mm”.  You will need to add “:ss.000” to the end of this, so it looks like this “m/d/yyyy h:mm:ss.000” .  Setting the cells to this will give you the highest resolution that Excel can show.

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