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From time to time, MicroStrain releases firmware upgrades for its 3DM-GX3® inertial sensors. These firmware upgrades represent operating improvements, new functions, etc. In most cases, the user may download these upgrades and perform the upgrade using a simple step-by-step process. This technical note describes which firmware upgrades may be accomplished by the user and which firmware upgrades must be done at the factory. Familiarity with 3DM-GX3® operation is assumed. The upgrade procedure employs a Microsoft Windows computer and the Microsoft HyperTerminal utility.

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Yes. We provide sample code for the Campbell Scientific CR1000 and CR3000 dataloggers.

Click here and navigate to the Sample Code on the Documentation tab.

The LORD MicroStrain 3DM-GX3-45 high-performance, miniature GPS-Aided Inertial Navigation System (GPS/INS) combines MEMS inertial sensors, a highly-sensitive embedded GPS receiver, and a complex Extended Kalman Filter to generate optimal position, velocity, and attitude (PVA) estimates. It is currently available with RS-232 and USB communication interfaces. A wireless communication interface can easily be added by employing off-the-shelf Bluetooth RS-232 adapters.

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Many inertial applications incorporate dataloggers. The datalogger can take many forms: hardware or software, analog or digital, simple or complex, and/or combinations of all. For our purposes, let’s work through a simple-digital-software datalogger. In this case, datalogger software is installed on a computer. The inertial sensor is connected to the computer via an RS-232 communication interface. The inertial sensor is pre-programmed to automatically send data when powered. The computer receives the stream of data and the datalogger software continuously records the stream to a data file.

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The LORD MicroStrain 3DM-GX3 inertial sensor family allows the user to pre-program the inertial sensor so that it continuously outputs specific data packets at specific sampling rates each time it is powered on. This functionality facilitates integration of the inertial sensor with other equipment and systems. For example, connection of the 3DM-GX3 inertial sensor to a datalogger becomes quite easy. The user pre-programs the 3DM-GX3 data output settings on his desktop, connects the 3DM-GX3® to the datalogger’s RS-232 port, powers the 3DM-GX3, and the datalogger records the inertial data. This technical note assumes some familiarity with your particular 3DM-GX3 inertial sensor and its accompanying MIP Monitor (Windows-based) software.

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The LORD MicroStrain® WSDA-Base-101-LXRS Wireless Analog Output Base Station supports all data acquisition sessions between wireless nodes and host computers including Synchronized Sampling (both Continuous and Burst modes), Armed Datalogging, Datalogging, Streaming and Low Duty Cycle. As an integral feature, the WSDA-Base-101-LXRS has an analog output back panel that supports analog data acquisition equipment (DAQs). Up to 8 sensor channels from one or multiple wireless nodes can be fed into a DAQ with simultaneous digital feed into a PC, or into a DAQ with the PC removed (stand-alone configuration). Each channel on the back panel has a 0 to 3 volt range representing the particular sensor’s full scale output. In some environments and with some equipment, the 0 to 3 volt range is not appropriate; many types of programmable logic controllers (PLCs) and DAQs have only current loop inputs, are therefore incompatible with voltage output sensors, and require a 4 to 20 mA output range to operate. This technical note demonstrates how to convert the 0 to 3 volt output to a 4 to 20 mA output using a third party converter and assumes familiarity with the WSDA-Base-101-LXRS, LORD MicroStrain wireless nodes and Node Commander software.

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The LORD MicroStrain V-Link-200 supports a wide range of Wheatstone bridge and analog sensors including acceleration, vibration, strain, load cells, torque, pressure, magnetic fields, displacement, etc.

As a basic function of support for these sensors, the node measures small voltages. The nodes can actually be repurposed to measure small currents. This is useful, for example, if one wanted to add the wireless capability of the nodes to a 4 to 20 mA sensor. See pages 50-51 of the V-Link 200 user's manual http://www.microstrain.com/sites/default/files/v-link-200_user_manual_85... for more information.

Yes, but you must be sure to cut the correct end or the plunger will not work and must be replaced.

1.       The M-DVRT plunger has a smaller diameter wire protruding from the end that is not inserted into the DVRT body.  This is the end that can be cut.  Another way to determine the correct end is to insert the plunger into the DVRT and observe the output.  If you get an output change, do NOT cut that end, as it is the end with the ferrite, and the plunger will no longer work if this end is cut.  You can use a pair of wire cutters to cut the M-DVRT plunger.

2.       The S-DVRT plunger looks like it is plugged at one end and hollow at the other end.  The plugged end is the end with the ferrite: do NOT cut that end.  Again, another way to determine the correct end is to insert the plunger into the DVRT and observe the output.  If you get an output change, do NOT cut that end, as it is the end with the ferrite, and the plunger will no longer work if this end is cut.  You can use a dremel tool to cut the S-DVRT plunger.

When cutting the plungers, keep in mind that you want some length of plunger protruding from the DVRT for mounting when it is fully compressed.

The GPS PPS signal is available on pin 7. It can drive one high impedance TTL input.

 

NMEA packets can be had by putting the 3DM-GX3-35 or 3DM-GX3-45 in GPS Direct mode and manipulating the devices with the GPS manufacturer’s software.

Here are two technical notes which show how this is done:

http://files.microstrain.com/8401-0017-Using-u-blox-Software-3DM-GX3-35-3DM-GX3-45.pdf

http://files.microstrain.com/8401-0013-Outputting-NMEA-Packets-to-GPS-Ready-Software.pdf

NMEA packets can also be generated in the user's own application by gathering the navigation data output by the 3DM-GX3-35 or 3DM-GX3-45 and formatting it into NMEA packets. The inertial sensor feeds navigation data to the host computer, the host computer formats the navigation data into NMEA packets, and sends them out the serial port to a NMEA-ready device.

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