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The main difference between single byte (SB) and MIP is as follows:

  • All MIP commands and data have a header and checksum.  SB only has a header (the echo of the command byte) and a checksum on the replies.  This means that the programmer has to create a header and calculate the checksum for a command before s/he sends the command.  This was not necessary with SB.
  • MIP setup and control commands (like start and stop continuous mode) send an ACK/NACK field with a reply.  SB does not.  The ACK/NACK field has an error code that can be used to confirm that a command was accepted.
  • MIP packets can contain multiple command and data fields.  SB commands and data only have one fixed field.

The reason we created MIP was the higher reliability for communications and control, plus the ability to have custom data messages.  SB was prone to phantom commands in a noisy environment.  In addition, SB had a limited number of data combinations available.

To move code from Single Byte to MIP with simple applications is fairly painless if you follow some guidelines.

  • You can “prebuild” all your setup and control commands and make them constants in your code.   You can plug the prebuilt packet constants into the same part of the code that you previously used to send a single byte command (In essence, you are sending a “multi-byte” command instead of a single byte command).  We have a “packet builder” tool in the MIP Monitor that will build the packet for you.  You can try out the command and then copy the packet and paste it directly into your code as a string constant.
  • When you design the MIP data message, make sure all the “data rate decimation” values are the same.  This will make all the data packets identical, which makes finding data in the packet similar to finding data in a SB data message (by using fixed offsets).

 

The impedance on the GPS connector is 50 ohms.

The 3DM-GX3 provides 3 volts power on the center pin of the connector (active antenna).

The DEMOD-DVRT and the DEMOD-DVRT-TC signal conditioners both have a Low Pass Filter.

http://www.microstrain.com/displacement/demod-dvrt

http://www.microstrain.com/displacement/demod-dvrt-tc

The filter is described as: 2 pole, active Butterworth, 3 dB down @ 800 Hz standard; factory adjustable 10 Hz-8 Khz

The filter is modified by manipulating resistors on the circuit board.

Resistors may either be removed or added or both.

These resistors may go into standoff sockets or require soldering/desoldering on the circuit board surface.

After the rework is done, good practice dictates that the signal conditioner and its paired sensor be recalibrated to reflect changes in noise characteristics.

We recommend that such work be done here at the factory.

 

All LORD MicroStrain wireless sensor nodes, wireless base stations, and wireless sensor data aggregators are shipped from the factory with their radio frequency set to channel 15 (2.425 GHz).

This channel setting was established during 2012.

Previously all wireless products were set to channel 25 (2.475 GHz).

If you are mixing new nodes and base stations with older nodes and base stations, please be cognizant of these different channel settings.

The Node Discovery function of Node Commander will help you sort out which nodes are on what channels; Node Discovery is channel independent and allows the base station to communicate with any node, no matter what channel it is on

Sampling methods such as synchronized sampling, low duty cycle, network broadcast, etc. require that all nodes are on the same frequency so you will want to insure that you have adjusted the channels settings of the nodes to suit.

As an example. here is the Quick Start Guide for the M-DVRT-9: http://files.microstrain.com/Micro_Sub_DVRT_Quick_Start_Guide.pdf

Page 7 refers to the Slope and Offset that you will need to enter into the Smart Motherboard software.

In the Smart Motherboard software, click Tools.

Click Configuration and the Configuration screen appears.

Select the appropriate channel (remember that each channel, i.e., each DVRT and DEMOD –DVRT signal conditioner card in the Smart Motherboard is calibrated separately) by checking the Channel check box.

Select the Linear Radio Button.

Enter the Slope and Offset in the number scroll boxes.

Select None in the Peak Detect drop-down.

Change the Units from Volts to mm (for millimeters) by wiping through with your mouse.

Click File.

Click Save As Default.

Click File.

Click Return and you are ready to sample in millimeters.

The MG-DVRT Microminiature Gauging and SG-DVRT Subminiature Gauging Differential Variable Reluctance Transducers are typically calibrated with their signal conditioning electronics at the factory. These calibrations are highly accurate and are always recommended. However, under certain conditions the user may determine that a field calibration should be performed. This technical note provides a step-by-step instruction to field calibration and assumes the user is familiar with the DVRT displacement transducer and its signal conditioning electronics (Motherboard, Smart Motherboard, or DEMOD-DC).

Click here.

A run-time component named ' tabctl32.ocx' has not been automatically registered with your Windows system for some reason.

Let’s register it manually:

Download the component http://download.microstrain.com.s3.amazonaws.com/component.zip.

Unzip the file.

Copy the component into the following folder on your computer: C:\WINDOWS\system32.

Click the Windows Start.

Click Run.

The Run window will appear.

Cut and paste (or type) this command into the Open drop-down box: regsvr32 c:\windows\system32\tabctl32.ocx

Click OK and you will receive a confirming message that the component has been registered.

Click OK in the message box.

Now try your Smart Motherboard application and the error will have been cured.

 

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Contacts

  • LORD Sensing - Sales
    459 Hurricane Lane
    Suite 102
    Williston VT, 05495
    USA
  • +1-802-862-6629 (United States)
  • https://www.microstrain.com